Understanding the Newturf Horse Card (Summary)

The first key tool for evaluating form and making an informed decision in betting on races at Newturf Virtual Racetrack is the Horse Card (Summary) page. This is an overview of a horse’s basic details, ability and preferences. A description of each element is provided below the diagram.

Newturf Horse Card

1. Horse name and (code). Each horse on Newturf has a unique identification number, shown here in brackets.

2. Discipline – there are 3 codes of racing on Newturf: flat racing, hurdling and harness racing. A horse cannot change from one discipline to another.

3. Sex, age and the date on which the horse is due to irreversibly retire from racing.

4. Stable owner – this refers to a real person that owns and makes decisions regarding the horse. Just as with real life racing, the ability of this person can affect the performance of the horse in the race. Statistics regarding this person are available by clicking on their name.

5. Trainer – this also refers to a real person that makes decisions regarding the preparation of this horse that might affect its performance in a race. Statistics regarding the performance of this person are available by clicking on their name.

6. Jockey – again this refers to a real person that makes decisions that can affect the performance of the horse during the race. At Newturf, most horses are jockeyed by their owners although other jockeys may also be hired to perform the task. Statistics regarding the performance of this person, in this role, can be accessed by clicking on their name.

7. Breeder – this is also a real person and while they have had input in the creation of the horse and its abilities, they cannot affect the performance of the horse in any particular race.

8. Sire – the male parent of the horse. The offspring may well inherit similar characteristics to their parents although this is not guaranteed. Details of the sire can be accessed by clicking on his name.

9. Mare – the female parent of the horse. The offspring may well inherit similar characteristics to their parents although this is not guaranteed. Details of the mare can be accessed by clicking on her name.

10. Racing Career – International or Regional. A horse may belong to one set or the other. An International horse may be downgraded to Regional but the reverse is not possible. A horse may only participate in races that are designated for its type. This element has no impact on betting.

11. Wins – the number of public races won by the horse since birth. Only public races are included, privately arranged races are excluded from this total.

12. Grade/Group – the grade (hurdling) or group (flat racing) is an indication of its ability and the level it must currently perform at (this may go down as well as up in flat racing but can only increase in hurdling.) In both cases, the lowest level (group/grade) is G while the highest is 1. In flat racing, horses are assigned a different rating for sprint, classic and staying distances. In hurdling, there is a single rating for all distances.

13. Earnings/net gains – the first figure (earnings) is equal to the prizemoney won by the horse during its entire career. The second figure (net gains) is the positive difference between the prizemoney won in a race and the entry fee. If the difference is negative for the race, the figure noted is zero.  The net earnings figure is not amended in case of private races or reserved races where the number of different owners that participated is less than 5.

14. 40 days P & L – is equal to the sum of the difference of the prizemoney won and the sum of the horse’s entry fees during the past 40 days. This could be an indication of the horse’s recent level of performance.

15. Mating quota/fee – this is the price requested by an owner for a covering (in the case of a stallion) and the number of coverings the stallion has available. This element has no impact on betting.

16. For each race run over 1600 meters, a balanced time is assigned to the horse. The balanced time of a horse is used to compare its performance over 1600 meters on different grounds (firm, good, yielding, soft, heavy). Caution should be used with this figure for betting purposes as it can prove misleading.

17. Handicap Value – this figure (in kilograms) indicates the weight the horse would be allocated if entered into a handicap race. Different values are given for different distances.

18. This chart is visible only at the owner’s discretion as it contains information that could be tactically useful to his opponents. It provides an indication of a horse’s traits and abilities, displayed as coloured blocks or squares. When using this chart for betting purposes, bear in mind that these are general indications only and horses in the same race are likely to have very similar values for speed, stamina and flexibility. Fighting Spirit has a significantly greater impact in sprint races than for longer distances.

19. Fitness Value (FV) – this value oscillates between 1 and 8 and can additionally be boosted (2 points) by the use of blinkers once every 10 days. The FV will have a significant impact on Fighting Spirit (in sprint races) and on Stamina in classic and staying races. It takes a good horse to overcome the effects of low fitness. Fitness is only displayed at the owner’s discretion.

20. Going preference – Ground conditions can be firm, good, yielding, soft and heavy. Each horse has a genetically predetermined preference for a particular type of surface and will perform best when conditions are closest to this. This preference is only displayed at the owner’s discretion.

21. This section displays previous performances in top level events and is a good indication of ability, especially when recent. It can be clicked upon to show further detail.

Please note that the example shown is an owner’s view of a horse card and may differ slightly from the one shown for betting purposes.